Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The interns tell all, spring 2019 edition

Each semester, I ask interns to write up a short post on their experiences, and to offer advice to fellow students. Here we go!

14 comments:

Cassandra McGrath said...

This semester I was an intern at Daily Hampshire Gazette in Northampton. In this position, I published articles in the news, business and lifestyle sections. What stands out to me most about this experience was the people. Many of the mornings that I came into the Gazette, the head editors would hold meetings at the desk where I sat. Hearing them interact with one another was not only exciting, but also very educational. Great minds, challenging each other for the better of the paper and I had a front row seat. Interns were also invited into weekly pitch meetings where the reporters came together to share what they are working on. This was probably my favorite part about the Gazette. Seeing what my day to day will be like as a professional journalist inspires me to keep pursuing my dreams. This semester has also had some crazy news weeks. Between Porta, UMass hockey and Hampshire College, it felt like the newsroom was always buzzing. I loved when the Gazette got loud from all the phone calls and laughter that comes with a busy day. I also had the opportunity to interview some pretty interesting people. For example, I published a front page article about a campout fundraiser for Cancer Connection and had the opportunity to speak to the volunteers who believed in the cause so much that they slept outside in the snow. This was more than just good journalism experience, it was increibley inspiring to meet these people. Since taking this position, I have grown my professional Twitter, developed a website and been promoted to an assistant editor position at the Daily Collegian. The Gazette was not only a valuable experience, but also a fun way to express what I love most in this world: journalism.

Cassandra McGrath said...

I have a few recommendations for future interns at the Gazette. First and foremost, go in with a good attitude. The editors notice when you want to be there and are looking to learn. They honestly want to help you and work with you so offer them the same respect and more. Also, there are some days when you won't receive an assignment for a while. Do not get discouraged. Remember how lucky you are to be there and keep working hard for them. Do not be afraid to ask if they need any help from you and always volunteer yourself. Additionally, don't be afraid to speak up. Editors love hearing your thoughts and feedback, especially those covering schools and universities. Lastly, pack food. There were some days that I couldn't leave for lunch and got pretty hungry. It never hurts to pack an extra granola bar. The Gazette also offers free coffee, so if you are a caffeine enthusiast like I am, take advantage of it. Be professional, positive and listen to all of their excellent advice. I am so grateful for this opportunity.

Shannon Macalingay said...

As a social media intern for a small business called Artspromo, I was in charge of a wide range of clients’ social media outlets. A majority of the clients were musicians who played classical or rock music, were in an orchestra or band, were jazz or gospel singers, instrumental players, or soloists. Other clients were popular authors and local business stores. There was one night where I made a post for Massamba Diop, a renowned drum soloist from Senegal. He was was the creator of Marvel movie Black Panther’s signature drum beat. The rhythm can be heard when the movie transitioned the scene’s setting to Wakanda, a country located in Africa in the Marvel Universe.Then the next night, I made and scheduled multiple posts for Dave’s Pet Food, a chainstore located in Hadley, Northampton, and Agawam. Just when I thought I couldn’t get any more local than that, the following week, I made a post for a well known guitarist from Croatia. Every set of posts I made were different and had to be tailored to how the client spoke, behaved, and wrote.
A tip for anyone who’s looking to be a social media intern—it’s okay if you don’t know everything, what matters is that you know how to look for that information and be able to solve it.

Matt Berg said...

This spring, I had the opportunity to intern at the Daily Hampshire Gazette in Northampton. As a freshman, I wanted to get experience right out of the gate, jumping into the field that I know I want to go into. Although it was intimidating at first, my decision to email Brooke in December was the best decision I have made yet at UMass.

Through learning the workings of a newsroom first-hand, I’ve grown more as a writer and reporter than I could have ever imagined. From interviews with strangers on the street to state senators to an 18-year-old candy shop owner, my initial hesitation with interviewing has turned into confidence, all thanks to my editors’ encouragement. I recommend the Gazette internship to anyone who wants to jump right into journalism and get your hands dirty from day one. The editors are kind and want to see you succeed. They will give you as many opportunities to thrive as you need, from advice to story ideas to motivation.

This semester I was lucky enough, with much help from my editors, to have published two front page stories. The first was about a Northampton High School scholarship being offered to female graduates that would train the recipient to get her private pilot’s license at the local airport. I went to the airport countless times to interview friends of the pilot who the scholarship was dedicated to, searched the Gazette archives to find past articles mentioning her, and spent hours learning about planes and aviation. After tracking down her last remaining relative, I was able to create my favorite story that I have written to date. Together, Brooke and I cut the story down from 40 inches to 25 inches and the story took up most of the front page the next day.

The story meant so much to people in the community and hearing the feedback from her friends made me feel like what I do really makes a difference in people’s lives. The two weeks I spent crafting the story taught me more than I have learned writing any piece for class. To anyone seeking a thrilling, fun, and fulfilling internship, the Gazette will not disappoint.

Unknown said...

This semester I interned for the sports section of the Daily Hampshire Gazette. This experience is the perfect follow-up to what you practice in Steve Fox’s sports journalism class as it essentially just expands on what you have already done. The difference is that you get a more authentic experience with the editor and writing on deadline.

My advice going into an internship with any sports section is to be prepared to be comfortable being uncomfortable. Much of what you will be asked to do you will have to learn on the fly, often times being throw right into the action. Still, don’t be afraid to ask questions early, and often, if you have them, and find strategies that are effective for you to complete the recaps.

Seek out and take whatever feedback you can get on your work. Most of the feedback you will receive is trying to make your work more clear and concise, which not only benefits the use of space for the newspaper but also allows you to incorporate elements of your story that you may not have been able to.

Most importantly, develop positive relationships, not only with your colleagues, but also with the coaches and sources that you work with and interview. Throughout the internship, and if you plan on continuing with this work, you never know when you’ll need to come back to a source.

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Emilie Cowan said...

This semester did an internship at the University of Massachusetts Amherst Athletics Marketing and Communications. Being a sports journalism major I was really excited to put all the tools I learned in my classes to experience. I was able to work in the office, in games, and award shows. As much as I loved working games I found an appreciation for the sports information directors that have to work in the office. I would crop roster pictures, update record books, help edit athlete bios, and anything else the directors needed. It was a great experience but my favorite part was working with the marketing team during the games and being an in-venue host. At first, I was nervous because I never publicly spoke in a venue that could hold almost 10,000 people but it gave me more experience than any class could. I had to get over a natural fear of public speaking which was the best thing that I was able to take from the internship. My advice to future interns is to always try new things! It might seem cliche but it is so important to expand your experiences because you will be able to gain skills along the way!

Max O'Day said...

Max O'Day said...


My time spent as an intern with the UMass Athletic’s Social Media and Marketing Department was extremely enjoyable. As one who has a passion for sports, I couldn’t have asked for a better internship. The media pass I was given before every game I worked granted me access all over both McGuirk Stadium as well as the Mullins Center. For football games, I captured picture/video from UMass’ end zone. For hockey games, I recorded directly behind the glass, and sat on court for all of the basketball games I worked. Being up close and personal for all of these events was awesome. At times, I forgot I was even at an internship. Being granted the power to post on the athletic department’s Snapchat and Instagram was a responsibility I enjoyed taking on. Social media is something that really interests me. Working with my own school’s accounts is something I’m proud to say I did. I would highly recommend this internship to anyone who enjoys athletics ,has a creative mind, and a good eye for quality social media content. The best part of this internship was the fact there were times I had to get out of my comfort zone to capture material the athletic department could use. For example, I was often tasked with filming coaches and players at certain points of a game where tensions are high and they may not want a phone in their face recording them!

Mackenzie Gobillot said...

This semester I was a marketing intern for a new business in Easthampton called Go With The Float. The flotation therapy center opened in December of 2018 and was looking for someone to help them reach out to local health and wellness professionals to get the word out about their new business. My work included sending emails to local businesses with discount codes to get people through the door, making promotional videos and flyers about the space and upcoming events, and helping with social media posts to keep the business relevant online. Though this was not directly related to journalism, I feel this internship allowed me to explore other options besides a newsroom or a broadcast studio, and showed me how my skills could be valuable in other fields of work. I've always enjoyed writing, but this internship allowed me to be more creative with writing, video, and photos that promoted the space and the services it offers. I would suggest any journalism major that is thinking about working outside of broadcast or the newsroom to explore other internships that give you a new perspective on your skill set and your mind as a journalist. I have found that because of the thing we are taught in our classes, we have a different angle to offer employers seeking marketing interns or other fields of work that may only look for those that majored in it.

Chase Purrington said...

This semester, I interned with the production team at WGBY in Springfield. With a great team atmosphere, my supervisors allowed me to do jobs that matter. On the first day, they were training me on how to operate studio cameras. From there, I learned teleprompter and graphics software. I even appeared in a promo for the show “Presencia”! Most of my work was with the show “Connecting Point” where you get to be a part of a team that produces shows every weekday on the local social and political landscape of Western Massachusetts.

For future interns, this is a wonderful place to work and receive some real experience at a TV station. The things you are doing matter. Although I had some studio experience in Greeley’s classes, you certainly don’t have to know everything in the beginning. They will teach you a variety of roles that will help prepare you for your career. Finally, ask questions! The team has a lot of experience and has seen how the industry has developed over the years.

Jack Martin said...

This semester, I worked as an intern for the Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival. I helped put on the festival by setting up the screenings each Wednesday night and creating information packets about each film. My main piece of advice for journalism students looking to find an internship is to not be afraid to branch out past the field of journalism. Despite working at a mostly film-based internship, I found that I could still apply the skills I learned in my journalism classes at the internship. The research skills I developed in the classroom helped me as I created the information packets for each film. My radio and broadcasting skills helped me when I made a PSA about the festival for WMUA. Not only will you be able to apply the journalism skills you’ve developed, but you’ll be able to acquire more skills in a different field. Journalists today must be well-rounded, so being able to have knowledge about multiple different fields is necessary to be a good journalist. Absolutely hone your news-writing and reporting skills as often as you can, but don’t be afraid to try new things. No matter what you do for an internship, it’s always possible to apply your journalism skills wherever you go.

Courtney Cabral said...

This semester, I was given the pleasure to serve as a marketing intern for UMass Athletics. This internship required tasks such as distributing promotional materials, providing critical game-day information, handling the schools mascot, interacting with fans, operating music and controlling the social media account for a specific event. I was supplied with an all-access pass to the Mullins Center, McGuirk Football Stadium, Garber Field, Lorden Field and the Sortino Softball Complex. As a Sports Journalism Major, it was nothing but pure joy to watch a game court-side, pressed against the ice or inside of a press-box. When it came to operating the social media, I was given the opportunity to utilize my creativity in order to provide a more exciting and enjoyable game day experience for the fans of UMass Sports. Most importantly, being behind the scenes allowed me to see what it takes for an athletic department to succeed and the value of teamwork in a highly competitive sport industry. The instructors and interns were incredibly supportive throughout this semester and encouraged me to go outside my comfort zone, practice my communication skills and build valuable connections. I was additionally given the opportunity to work inside of an office, researching valuable information that would support the departments success in the future.
For future interns, I would not let the opportunity of working for UMass Athletics slip through your fingers. With the UMass Hockey team making it to the Frozen Four, I felt more than blessed to be apart of history and something that everyone does not get the chance to experience. I am incredibly lucky to work at a school that got to attend the national championship and know it will be hard pressed to be somewhere like this ever again. Truly cherish the opportunities the UMass athletics department has to provide. It will give you the confidence, grit and competitive nature you'll need to succeed in a career within this industry and that is something truly priceless.

Angela Kirchner said...

This semester I interned at the Daily Hampshire Gazette in Northampton. This was a newsroom internship which required me to cover a few general assignment stories over the course of the semester, mostly assigned by Gazette editor Brooke Hauser. My internship at the Gazette provided me with the one experience you cannot truly get in the classroom, the experience of actually being in the newsroom. One of the best parts of this internship was sitting in on weekly editorial meetings with the entire news staff. We would hear different story pitches and sometimes be able to come up with our own pitches as well. This was also the time when the editors would cover issues in the newspaper. It was interesting to see what parts of journalism those actually working in the field are focusing on. Occasionally these editorial meetings would include work-shops on things like common mistakes in AP style, or how to start a podcast.
The classes at UMass more than prepared me for the actual reporting I had to do. Once I got back into the groove of writing for journalism, after taking no newswriting courses last semester, I found that I knew what I was doing most of the time. I felt comfortable reporting, and interviewing was a breeze. The part I was missing in the classroom was working with an editor, having other journalists around who are doing their own thing. The most invaluable part of the internship was simply getting to experience a newspaper, and I am so happy I got to do that in my last semester in the journalism department.

Unknown said...

Megan Hayes
W. E. B. Du Bois Development and Communication Internship
Spring 2019
This Spring semester, I had the pleasure of interning for Carol Connare as a Development and Communication Intern at the W. E. B. Du Bois Library on campus. Though I’ve been employed since last January, I was able to expand my work experience through the internship the past couple of semesters. Our job as a department is to work with alumnus and donors that donate to the library. Every year, donations are used to get new equipment, furniture, and programs to update library resources, spaces, and events. I’m expected to reach out to donors who’ve recently donated and thank them, create video and photo content to send to donors, and share those videos across the library’s social media pages. I also work on videos to support the library and some of the clubs and organizations it funds, such as working to create video content for the new Seed Library in the Science and Engineering Library.
What I had this semester that I didn’t before was more time. Only having to take one online class this semester left me time for career training. This year, I completed various projects across several multimedia platforms. I worked events such as UMassGives, Author Talks, and alumni donor speeches. I had access to Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Audition, and Adobe Lightroom. This package costs thousands of dollars and I, excluded from the library, would never have access to these programs otherwise. As a graduate from UMass Amherst, I am able to take away everything I have learned from my academic life and from my office experience working for the Department of Development and Communication. I am so grateful to have been able to work in a place that brings so many people joy every day!