Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Don't be a jerk and other work tips: Take it from an intern, summer 2014

Each summer, as part of their summer internship assignments, UMass journalism students must write a post about what they learned over the summer, and offer advice to their fellow students about the workplace and/or the internship process. It's a good way to share information.

Here's what they wrote last summer.

Below, see this summer's crop as they start to wind down their internships.

20 comments:

jason.kotoch.art said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
jason.kotoch.art said...

I spent two months living in New York City where I was a social media and outreach intern for Democracy Now!. I learned a lot, actually, I learned things that I didn’t even know I had to learn and I’m grateful for it. I learned that you can’t be too prepared. During the two weeks leading up to my first day on the job, I read old DN! stories, explored the website, and read the latest book by Amy Goodman (the host of the show for those who don’t know). In addition to getting more familiar with the show, I started paying close attention to all DN! social media activity. I started following them on every platform. This gave me a sense of the tone of Twitter versus Tumblr (yes, there is a difference). By the end of my internship I was sad to leave. I loved my boss (I use the term boss lightly), I loved my coworkers and I loved the work I did. Fortunately, I did a good job and anticipate working with DN! in some capacity in the future.

We’ll call these guidelines:

Don’t be a jerk- I don’t have to qualify this, you know what I mean.

Don’t EVER be late- Your professors might give you the stink eye when you stroll into class fifteen minutes late but on the job, you get fired. I saw it happen. Also, nobody gives a rats ass about your excuses, least of all your teachers or your boss so just shut up already.

Leave your ego at the door- You don’t know more than the person who’s been doing the job for 20 years no matter how many articles you wrote for the Collegian last semester. Listen to and be grateful when receiving criticism, it will make you better.

Step up- There’s always more work to do and I am willing to bet that your boss will really appreciate you offering to do a little extra at the end of your shift because if we are being honest, you’re probably not going to be doing anything that spectacular with the rest of your day anyways. Fifteen minutes goes a long way in the eyes of your boss and hell, you might actually learn something!

Pull your pants up- You might be able to get away with wearing droopy sweats or yoga pants and your favorite water stained Uggs in Chem 101, but your boss will notice if you look like an idiot so don’t look like an idiot.

Now that I’m looking at this list, I’m pretty sure that you can apply these guidelines to most areas of your life. Go do your internship and try not to end up like a coworker who got canned for breaking almost all of these guidelines. Nobody looks cool with mascara running down their cheeks while waiting for the downtown F train just before lunch.

Theodora Makris said...

Over the summer I interned at the Huntington Chamber of Commerce in my hometown, Huntington, New York. Through this internship I had gained a secondary internship at the Long Islander Newspaper. At the Chamber of Commerce one of my responsibilities was writing a weekly column for the paper, informing readers about the upcoming events the Chamber would be hosting. Because the Chamber holds several events throughout the year for the community, I was also asked to help plan many of the events, which sometimes had upwards of 350 attendees. There were only five of us at the office, so collaboration was a big part of the job. I enjoyed working with others, because it taught me that patience and input from others really makes for the best results.

After submitting four articles at Long Islander for the Chamber, the editor of the paper called me and asked if I was willing to split my time between internships. I was so happy to receive this call, and quickly accepted the offer. At this point I had no experience in reporting, but I learned that just saying yes and rolling with the punches is the best way to gain valuable experience. I started working at the paper the following week, and was quickly submersed in field reporting. The best part of the job was networking and creating contacts through work, not to mention practicing my writing and reporting skills. They did not make me feel like an intern, but as a staff reporter who had to adhere to the same guidelines as everyone else.

Working at both the Chamber and at the paper helped develop my communication skills, a tool that is very important in whatever field you choose, but is especially true in Journalism. Being able to network and having persistence is really what puts you ahead of the game. Even if you feel like you’re being a bother, people really respond to your dedication. I received positive feedback from people I got in touch with, who were happily surprised that an intern had such tenacity. These were very worthwhile internships and I would recommend that any student try to land one.

Marie Noga said...

I spent a month and a half interning at the Boston Herald. I'm new as a journalism major so I spent most of my time shadowing and observing how a newspaper is run. I got to experience how a radio station is run (Herald Radio. yes that's a thing) and I also spent a lot of time with photographers and videographers. My experience was strictly an educational one, without any pressure or crazy supervisors and I'm super grateful for that kind of opportunity.
For those getting ready to start an internship, who you know is essential. Get to know people who can present the greatest opportunities, but also the people who will give you the realest sense of whatever business you're interning for. Ask questions, and be polite. Learn to keep your mouth shut; that was essential for me I found. You're an intern, so don't cause problems and try to be as helpful as possible. Make whatever is thrown at you and remember, even the boring moments can teach you something!

Taylor Gilmore said...

This summer I worked two internships that were very different, but overlapped greatly throughout the summer. I was an intern in the Newsroom at WCVB-TV and at a public relations firm in Boston called Schneider Associates. At SA, we would monitor the news to try to get relevant stories placed for our clients, and would even contact Channel 5 with pitches. It was really interesting to see how important media relations is, and how it works on both ends.

At WCVB, I was very intimidated, but after a while I found people who took an interest in helping the interns, we just had to seek them out. The newsroom is a busy place, and you have to take the work that they give you and do a good job- even when the tasks can be as small as making photo copies and delivering them to the producer while they're live. Writing stories for the newscast was the most rewarding part, because you would hear your story be read on the air. Although it wasn't what I expected, I'm grateful for the experience of being able to see the work that goes into a newscast and the many different positions that are open to journalists at a TV station. The biggest lessons I took away from this internship are to ask questions and do whatever task you are given well and with a smile. People are always willing to answer your questions and it'll open up the conversation. From "hey can I help you with whatever you're doing?" to asking something specific about their job, it shows your engaged and interested. Having a good attitude even if you aren't enjoying what you're doing can make a big impact on your boss or supervisor about your overall work ethic.

Schneider Associates is a much smaller organization that WCVB-TV. Because of this, I was able to work hands on with real accounts. I worked with many different types of companies from consumer products, to nonprofits and startups, to colleges and universities. There was something new going on every day. I was able to write pitches, press releases, and media alerts and find and call journalists around the country to pitch story ideas. It was intimidating but very exciting to be able to call reporters at the Wall Street Journal and Washington Post as an intern and tell them all about a pitch you wrote and why it's relevant to them. I didn't know anything about public relations before I started my internship, and I learned about so much that I didn't even know was part of the job. I was also in an intern team competition where we collaborated and created launch plans for real companies and products and presented them to the firm in groups of 5. It was a great learning experience and opportunity to get to know the other interns more personally and show the staff how much we had learned from them. Networking with other interns, I found, is really important too!

No matter what internship you take part in, you can always learn something valuable. You never know what to expect from any given company, so you should go in with an open mind and the desire to learn anything and everything you can. Even if an internship isn't what you expected, it's important to stick it out and make the best of it. Internships are meant to help you explore potential career paths, so don't be afraid if you find one that isn't for you. You could end up finding your passion so it's worth exploring your options!

Nick Canelas said...

The experience and new skills I gained during my internship at WEEI.com were invaluable. I spent my summer responsible for managing, producing, and pitching online content focused on both local and national newsworthy events in sports during my desk shifts, and assisted on Boston Red Sox beat coverage at Fenway Park.

With my work at the Collegian over the last three years coupled with my part-time work at the Nashua Telegraph, my media experience has heavily revolved around newspapers. So, working solely for the web was still a relatively new experience for me. There were more adjustments to make than I expected.

I often think faster than I can type when I'm writing a story, which has resulted into a habit for typos. Given my newspaper background, I had become dependent on editors to catch those mistakes and keep my content clean.

I wasn't always afforded that during my internship, however. I was supervised by an editor, but there were times where he was unavailable and needed me to immediately publish a breaking news item. If there were easily avoidable mistakes, not only would I pay for it with a virtual beating in the comments section, but my editor would also express his disappointment. The feeling is far from rewarding, so I've had to train myself to be more mindful of the mistakes I am making.

I have also learned to be more aggressive as a reporter by working with WEEI.com Red Sox beat writers Rob Bradford and Alex Speier, who have given me numerous tips on how to build quality working relationships and reliable sources that could be valuable in providing information one day. That aggressiveness has been especially important lately, as I've been working on a profile on Red Sox outfielder Allen Craig, highlighting his baseball upbringing and his development as a player. A California native, Craig has been across the country with the Red Sox during their eight-game road trip over the last week and a half, so I've been forced to take it upon myself to track down old coaches and acquaintances who could be sources of information for this story. It has been a weeklong process, but I have been rewarded for my persistence as of late. I will talk to Craig for the story this weekend with a greater knowledge of his background, which should result in better answers and more information.

With all that being said, the experience to me isn't the reason you should get an internship. If you want a job in this competitive field, you need experience outside the classroom, or else it's going to be incredibly difficult to get the attention of any employer.

My advice for anyone struggling to find an internship is to be a pest. Be the biggest pain in the ass you can be. While some media organizations have online applications, I have learned from experience that many do not. That means you will have to reach out directly to editors and supervisors in order to express your interest in interning. However, most editors are terrible at responding to emails because they receive so many in a day. Chances are one email will not be enough, even if they respond to the first one.

This has happened to me on multiple occasions. My editor at WEEI.com responded to my initial email last winter, but over the next months I got an email along the lines of "Sorry I missed this, things have been crazy around here," before finally getting an interview. It was frustrating, but the persistence paid off.

Allyson Michitson said...
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Brandy Robidoux said...

This summer I interned at a company called Niche Media in New York City. The company publishes a series of regional magazines from the East Coast to the West Coast. I worked in the fashion department specifically, which turns out, also happens to be the most stressful. I have to admit I was skeptical at first, when the first few days, I watched the company interns leave promptly at 6, while the fashion interns were kept until 7, 8 or 9 p.m. I also realized that it was extremely hard work, and that I would be running around the city with heavy bags more than I would be sitting at a desk. By the 2nd week, two fellow interns had quit. While the thought had crossed my mind, I decided that quitting was not an option for me, and boy am I happy I stayed.
The longer I stayed, and the more my editors realized I could handle the fast paced environment of our office, the easier things became. They became more trusting, giving me larger projects to work on, and showed a genuine appreciation for the work I did. After a month and a half of being there, I was assisting on major photo shoots and helping to develop editorial content. I was thrilled. Looking back, I don’t think I could have been thrown into a situation that could have better prepared me for the world of fashion magazines. While it was not always easy, my time at Niche Media was certainly memorable and I am so grateful to have had the opportunity I did. If I had to offer advice it’s that old fashioned hard work goes a long way. People really do take notice when you go the extra mile. Also, don’t be afraid to ask questions! Some of the biggest opportunities I was given were given to me because I simply asked.

Allyson Michitson said...

I spent this summer as an intern at Boston Casting, which is the largest casting company in New England. The company works to cast commercials, industrials/training videos, and even major motion pictures. This was the first internship I have had and I must say I had quite the summer.

I learned so much about the casting process and I can honestly say it was probably a once in a lifetime opportunity. I mean how many people can say that they helped cast multiple projects including three major movies that will be filming in and around Boston this fall, one of which is the sequel to a certain movie about a certain foul-mouthed teddy bear? I met some amazing people and I learned what it takes to make it in the entertainment industry.

Multiple times this summer, the casting directors said that working at Boston Casting is our own version of "The Devil Wears Prada" only not quite as serious. The owner, Angela, can be really fun and funny sometimes but most of the time she is pretty intimidating and some interns even said they were scared of her. She's obviously not trying to be mean, she's just always extremely stressed out and wants to make sure everything gets done just the way she wants it. On our first day, the casting directors told the interns not to worry about what Angela says, or more accurately yells, and to just let her do her thing. Which brings me to my number one piece of advice: you have to take all the yelling and criticism with a grain of salt and with a smile.

You can't let every offhand remark, snide comment, or criticism get you down. You have to just let it roll off your shoulder and not affect you in a negative way. I was definitely intimidated, stressed and even annoyed at times but I never let it show, I always had a smile on my face and I did whatever job they needed me to do, no matter how much I hated it. That's part of being an intern and my attitude really did pay off because on the last day of my internship, all the casting directors, including Angela, were genuinely sad to see me go and they all told me what a great job I did this summer and that they wanted me to come back over winter break. One of the casting directors even told me straight up that I was her favorite intern this summer.

I had a great time this summer and I really enjoyed being a part of the beginning stages of movies and seeing what the audition process is like. I even got to audition for a few random commercials. I never would have had any of the opportunities I did this summer if I had settled for an internship where I was doing something I didn't love. So don't let your boss stress you out too much or make you dread going to work every day and never settle anything less than your dreams.

Kaitlin Boyer said...

My internship in the tape archives at CBS Sports in New York City has been one of the biggest and most valuable investments I have made for my future. After a tedious application process and three interviews, I was really excited yet nervous to start this internship. As many have already stated, nothing can compare to being completely thrown into the career environment you wish to work in and this helped me to build on what I already know about the industry and to open new doors. It’s one thing to like sports but it is a completely different thing to work in them. This internship reinforced how much I want to work in this industry but also showed me how to properly pave my path to get to where I want to be.

Tape Archives is the supply center for the producers to come and make their art. Every feature, highlight wrap, or preview produced for the upcoming events must start in archives. One of my main tasks was to respond to requests from the broadcast associates, associate directors, and producers. This involved using an electronic system called NESBIT to search for the tapes and view the tapes. Then, I would have to record the time codes to ensure the clips the producers wanted were on the tapes. I thought tapes were becoming obsolete in this day and age. However, I was surprised to know that every single broad CBS Sports and CBS Sports Network does is still recorded on several formats of tape as well as hard drive and a cloud system called Invenio. CBS Sports mainly focuses on PGA golf, US Open tennis, and pre-season NFL during the summer so a lot of my work involved footage of these three broadcasts. Throughout my internship, I had the opportunity to talk to producers in other departments and also sit in on studio tapings to observe how the footage is used. While my internship was a different department than what I want to do, I was able to talk to people about how to break into the talent/on-air side of sports broadcasting.

An internship is what you make of it. Yes, this is cliché but it applies to everything in life. What you put in, is what you ultimately will get out. This is something one of my co-workers said to me at the beginning. My first two weeks I was hesitant to approach people but once I got rid of that fear, I was happy with the outcome. Sure it’s easier to just sit there and do nothing after you finish the task at hand but what makes a person stand out is when they do their job first but then find other ways to help out and take initiative. One of the most important things I’ve learned about this industry is that you have to make a good name for yourself. No one owes you anything especially when you start at the bottom of a huge company. Yes, you are going to have to sometimes do the dirty work. You are going to have to take a cab 30 blocks downtown to pick up something for a producer. You are going to have to make boxes and deliver packages. You are going to be yelled at if you do something wrong but if you prove you can fix it, you can learn from that mistake. I’ve learned that this is your rite of passage in this industry because everyone who came before you had to do it. You have to suck it up and not take things personally. If you are prepared, you will succeed. Hard work does not go unnoticed. If a producer or supervisor can trust you to make 30 photocopies and have tapes dubbed by the end of the day, then they will certainly recognize that they can trust you with greater tasks.

Lastly, you have to network. Who you know can make a difference. I’ve also found you also have to make a constant effort to maintain these relationships. Continue to be yourself and be positive. Dress nice. Apply for every internship, even if you have your doubts. You never what opportunity can come your way!

Jesse Mayfield-Sheehan said...

This summer I did two internships: one with the features department at NESN (New England Sports Network) and one with the sports department at WCVB (the ABC affiliate in Boston).

At NESN, a vast majority of my work involved logging tape, which is a very mundane task, but a very important one in the broadcast business, and one my supervisor was very appreciative of. It was all worth when I got the chance to write the scripts for my own feature stories to air on NESN. I’d had some experience writing for broadcast at UMass, but I’d never written for a professional station before, and my supervisor was a tough judge. I’d had my work edited by professors at UMass, but a professional TV station producer has a completely different standard, and they won’t just give you a lower grade, they will send your work back and tell you to start over. My supervisor would send my scripts back four or five times before they were anywhere near ready for air, but as a result, my writing skills improved significantly. If you ever get a chance to have an internship where you can actually write your own material, take it, because writing for a professional news outlet is not only a big mark on your resume, it’s a great opportunity to improve your skills. These kinds of opportunities are more common in print and online journalism than they are for broadcast, but regardless, pursue all of them.

At WCVB, again, most of my work was pretty simple, as it often involved relaying stuff from my supervisor, the sports producer, to other members of the news staff. However, it also involved suggesting and discussing ideas for what to do for the nightly news segments, and the producer actually respected my opinions. Most of the time, he would go with his own ideas, but he always listened to my input, and sometimes he would use it, and it felt great. He also taught me how to write show rundowns, which was invaluable, because I had never worked in production before, so I had never thought about what stories I wanted to tell throughout the segment, what order I was going to tell them in, and how I was going to present them. I had also never used the software ENPS (a software commonly used by TV stations for writing show rundowns) before, so learning how to use it was huge. To my knowledge, UMass doesn’t have any courses that teach broadcast production (I could be wrong, there are some new broadcast journalism courses coming this year, and there might be some production courses outside the journalism department I don’t know about), so if you’re interested in pursuing a career in broadcast journalism, I would recommend taking an internship where you learn these kind of skills, because Professor Madsen (the former UMass broadcast professor) said there are a lot more opportunities right now in production than for on-air talent. These opportunities can be found at a lot of stations, including all the major Boston networks: ABC, NBC, CBS, and FOX, so if you’re looking for a broadcast internship, look at these stations.

Daniel Rodriguez said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Daniel Rodriguez said...

This summer I interned once again with NBCUniversal. For the last three months, I’ve been working at NBC’s owned and operated station KNBC in Los Angeles. My main duties were to act as an associate producer for one of the station's reporters.

I would come in each day and research stories for the tech segment which aired on the noon newscast. I would then write the scripts and find graphics for the segment which ultimately made air. In the afternoon, we would go out in the field to cover developing stories around the Los Angeles area. This is when I would help with field producing aspects such as calling police stations, hospitals and other sources to track breaking news. Some of these stories included a lightning strike in Venice Beach which killed a young teenager and a water main break near UCLA which flooded the campus. From time to time I would write stories for NBC LA’s website as well.

I gained quite a bit of knowledge from this internship. I learned how to work with different types of people in a fast-paced environment. I realized that there will be times when you work terrible hours (I worked the 2 a.m. to 1 p.m. shift for two weeks). Most importantly, I gained a better sense of what I'll need to succeed in this field.

My advice to anyone is to always make yourself proactive. If there isn't anything to do, reach out (in a non-annoying way) to help someone in your organization. In every workplace, you will run into very nice people and some not so friendly people. Always be on time, do your best and don't take things personally. If you make a mistake, move on because everyone else already has.

Internships are the best learning experiences you'll ever have in college. Do as many as you can because they’ll make you more competitive when you start searching for jobs. Apply, apply apply!

Stefan Geller said...

Over the summer I interned at my local newspaper, The Arlington Advocate, and unlike many interns who just fetch coffee and make photocopies, I was pretty much an unpaid journalist who got far fewer stories than everyone else and of much less importance. My internship helped me learn a lot of things about journalism I did not expect when I started, particularly protocals: you must always ask permission and take the name of whoever you photograph for an article, you must always ask the interviewee for permission to use a tape recorder, and you must always include the age of the interviewee if they are under eighteen years old.
Apart from my hands-on experiences, I was taught new information about the field during the several mandatory intern meetings that were held throughout the summer. In my first meeting, my fellow interns and I were taught about the photography portion of journalism. The first lesson was that it’s best to just show up and take pictures of people working when the workload is full rather than ask them when they are free, because they will set up a time when they aren’t working which is the opposite of what you want to capture. Other photography lessons included keeping the sun/lighting on your back, double checking the lighting and background, and that in general the photo is the first thing readers will notice so make it interesting and reflect the story. In another intern meeting we discussed the general guidelines for writing stories: Try to keep most stories short and simple, sentences shouldn’t be longer than 25 words each, avoid quotes that don’t help the story, and most importantly make the reader care. Those are the biggest lessons I learned. As for advice I can give? No matter how bad the job may seem, remember that you are just an intern, not some important higher up. Everybody has got to start somewhere so just stick through all the BS and learn as much as you can from the experience. And do not do anything to sabotage your bosses opinion of you because you probably took the internship as a resume booster and that's not worth much if your boss gives you a bad review.

Stefan Geller said...

Over the summer I interned at my local newspaper, The Arlington Advocate, and unlike many interns who just fetch coffee and make photocopies, I was pretty much an unpaid journalist who got far fewer stories than everyone else and of much less importance. My internship helped me learn a lot of things about journalism I did not expect when I started, particularly protocals: you must always ask permission and take the name of whoever you photograph for an article, you must always ask the interviewee for permission to use a tape recorder, and you must always include the age of the interviewee if they are under eighteen years old.
Apart from my hands-on experiences, I was taught new information about the field during the several mandatory intern meetings that were held throughout the summer. In my first meeting, my fellow interns and I were taught about the photography portion of journalism. The first lesson was that it’s best to just show up and take pictures of people working when the workload is full rather than ask them when they are free, because they will set up a time when they aren’t working which is the opposite of what you want to capture. Other photography lessons included keeping the sun/lighting on your back, double checking the lighting and background, and that in general the photo is the first thing readers will notice so make it interesting and reflect the story. In another intern meeting we discussed the general guidelines for writing stories: Try to keep most stories short and simple, sentences shouldn’t be longer than 25 words each, avoid quotes that don’t help the story, and most importantly make the reader care. Those are the biggest lessons I learned. As for advice I can give? No matter how bad the job may seem, remember that you are just an intern, not some important higher up. Everybody has got to start somewhere so just stick through all the BS and learn as much as you can from the experience. And do not do anything to sabotage your bosses opinion of you because you probably took the internship as a resume booster and that's not worth much if your boss gives you a bad review.

James Bottini said...

I had the opportunity to intern for the Philadelphia 76ers this summer at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA. I was a statistics intern for the legendary 76ers’ Director of Statistics, Harvey Pollack. I learned a lot while working my first full time job this summer and hope my experiences can help you future interns.
Going into the internship I honestly had no idea what to expect and that taught me a very important lesson before I even started, first impressions are everything. If you are unsure how to dress for your first day, always dress to impress. I showed up my first day in a full suit which turned out to be overdressed for the job, however, I could see my boss as well as my fellow interns were impressed. In addition to dressing the part, always aim to be the first in the office. Not just on the first day, but every day. It will be noticed and although it may seem unnecessary at times, it will pay off.
In addition to delivering with a strong first impression, I learned it is not just how you start, it is how you finish. After a few weeks of getting acclimated to the schedule and work you may fall into a routine, which can be good. Consistent hours and work are inevitable sometimes, but they should never result in your performance dropping. Always give your best effort while working regardless of who’s watching. Eventually people will be watching and you want to be in good habit of always doing your best work.
Being an intern has its benefits and as well as its hardships. Take the experience with a grain of salt and always stay humble and motivated. There will always be an unlimited amount of peers gunning for the same positions as you at every level. Remember that and always give your best effort and you will find yourself rewarded for it.

John Carrigg said...

This summer I had the opportunity to intern at State Street Corporation. During my time at State Street, I learned a lot about the business world, and what it takes to succeed. There were a few major themes that I took out of the internship that I did not fully understand prior to my experience. Most important is to "dress to impress". I'm sure most current and future interns have heard this at one point in their lives, but it is something that cannot be stressed enough. The first impression is a big part of anyone's career, and the physical appearance is one that opens (or closes) the door to what could be a very long, or very short time working somewhere new. If you walk in every morning looking prepared, it can only help you in the long run. Second lesson learned was to get your sleep!! No one can function on 4 hours of sleep for a full day at work. I tried to pull it off a few times, but it was a futile effort. I could start off the day alright, but as it went on the fatigue would set in. I did not make that mistake many times. Third and lastly is to be energetic and eager at your new place of work. Superiors want workers who are eager to learn and advance themselves. If you are someone who is introverted, do your best to make yourself available and get involved! That is the best way to integrate yourself into this new setting, and make the most of the situation. Enjoy your time as interns! It goes by a lot faster than you'd think!

Emma Sandler said...

I interned this summer at the women’s fashion magazine Marie Claire. I worked in the Fashion Closet with Fashion Assistant Jonathan Borge and roughly a dozen other interns. My duties included picking up clothing and accessory samples from across Manhattan, checking them in by taking photos and uploading them onto the server, packing up clothing trunks for photo shoots, and organizing the fashion closet. I also occasionally transcribed interviews for Fashion Writer Jessica Minkoff and for Jonathan Borge.
My biggest piece of advice for those who want to work in magazines is apply in early February (for the summer) by gathering all the magazines you like and pouring through the masthead. Don’t look at just brand name magazines; look for the smaller ones or the new ones, or even the ones that are exclusively online too.
Send your resume and cover letter to ABSOLUTELY EVERYONE on the masthead and don’t let up. Once you apply wait about two weeks and then consistently email everyone once a week about whether they have looked at your resume and setting up an interview. Everyone in the industry is so busy that they might not initially see your email or it may have ended up in their spam folder. That is why writing to them again is important.
Working at a fashion magazine allowed me to wear my jeans to work, but this didn’t mean that I treated everyday like it was casual Friday. At the same time working in the closet meant to I needed to dress functionally, so have a pair of flat shoes in your bag if you do like to wear heels. But most importantly when you start working, remember that manners go a long way. Everyone appreciates someone who’s willing to help, and those who say “please” and “thank you.”

Christian Yapor said...

Christian Yapor

This summer I interned at the Latino Education Institute (LEI) in Worcester MA. I conducted interviews for news stories and press releases, created project plans, and I created newsletters for the LEI.

I found it interesting to learn about the different programs the LEI runs throughout the whole year to encourage Latino individuals and their families to pursue higher education. I also liked seeing how this organization collaborated with other organizations such as the Worcester Public Schools (WPS), and the African Community Education (ACE). I learned how important it was to never forget to mention any of these partners in my newsletters, because they play a very important role in running these programs.

I wrote a couple profile stories for my newsletter including the a story of a young high school girl who was accepted to participate in a summer training program in New Mexico, as well as the profiles to two middle school boys who were a part of the English Language Learners (ELL) summer program. I loved interviewing these young students and learning their stories as well as their perspectives on the programs. As a journalist I was able to give these students a voice in a newsletter that is sent to over 1,000 people on the receiving list. The students and people I interviewed for the newsletters were always interested in reading the final news stories I created. And we received a lot of positive feedback on the newsletter we sent out.

I also wrote a project plan for the “Latino Heritage Project” which is a project designed to tell the story of the Latino people in the community. Why they moved here? How long have they been here? What words of wisdom can they share with us? etc. Through this project planning, I learned that there are a lot of details things to consider when tackling a huge project like this (resources and money for example).

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